Medical Education Blog

Reflecting on what is missing in medical education – A letter to a mentor.

Below is an excerpt from a letter I recently sent to a friend and mentor. I hope by sharing it it may inspire others to think through these issues, and hopefully to share their ideas with the community.   Dear (Mentor): We began our conversation with the definition of learning: "Learning is the extraction

Welcome to the ArcheMedX Blog

Welcome to the ArcheMedX blog.

Our goal for this site is to share our thoughts on the science of CME with a bent towards the online learning and assessment, but if history serves as evidence we will be commenting on much, much more.

ArcheMedX was founded with one clear purpose in mind, “to build the structure that simplifies learning.” And over the past year Joel and I have spent hundreds of hours exploring what works and what is missing in medical education. What has become increasingly obvious is that the traditional focus of developing and delivering de novo content to clinician learners has failed to have the impact that is needed to sufficiently and efficiently advance healthcare. Instead we believe that a new model must evolve – a model in which a ubiquitous learning architecture is engineered.

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CLASSIC POST: Re-engineering the Data Stream from Meetings to Medical Practices

Here is a brief excerpt from our latest Medical Meetings cover story:

For some in the medical community, the frustrations and the inadequacies of the CME system described above are glaring, and many have begun to engineer their own personal workarounds. But homegrown efforts and small peripheral technology solutions aren’t going to fix the inefficiencies and failures of the current knowledge stream. 

While “need” and “education” are defined locally, an efficient flow of new medical information into practice requires a re-engineering of the very system of data collection, review, publishing, and subsequent dissemination and education. This means the central players in the medical community—the societies, associations, research institutions, and educational providers—must evolve as well, embracing the parallel movements of rapid-learning healthcare systems and social learning.