Category : Social Media & Medical Education

ABSTRACT: Evaluating the use of twitter as a tool to increase engagement in medical education.

BACKGROUND: Social media is regularly used by undergraduate students. Twitter has a constant feed to the most current research, news and opinions of experts as well as organisations. Limited evidence exists that examines how to use social media platforms, such as Twitter, effectively in medical education. Furthermore, there is limited evidence

MANUSCRIPT: Leveraging Social Media to Promote Evidence-Based Continuing Medical Education

IMPORTANCE: New dissemination methods are needed to engage physicians in evidence-based continuing medical education (CME). OBJECTIVE: To examine the effectiveness of social media in engaging physicians in non-industry-sponsored CME. DESIGN: We tested the effect of different media platforms (e-mail, Facebook, paid Facebook and Twitter), CME topics, and different "hooks" (e.g., Q&A, clinical pearl and best

ABSTRACT: Impact of a Social Media Group Page on Undergraduate Medical Physiology Learning

OBJECTIVE: To investigate the impact of associating classroom learning of medical physiology with a Facebook group page in an all-women medical college of a conservative small city in Pakistan. STUDY DESIGN: Qualitative interpretivist study using semi-structured interviews. PLACE AND DURATION OF STUDY: Women Medical College Abbottabad, Pakistan, from March to December 2014. METHODOLOGY: Aclosed Facebook study group

ABSTRACT: Gamified Twitter Microblogging to Support Resident Preparation for the American Board of Surgery In-Service Training Examination

OBJECTIVE: We sought to determine if a daily gamified microblogging project improves American Board of Surgery In-Service Training Examination (ABSITE) scores for participants. DESIGN: In July 2016, we instituted a gamified microblogging project using Twitter as the platform and modified questions from one of several available question banks. A question of the day

MANUSCRIPT: Evaluating the use of twitter as a tool to increase engagement in medical education

BACKGROUND: Social media is regularly used by undergraduate students. Twitter has a constant feed to the most current research, news and opinions of experts as well as organisations. Limited evidence exists that examines how to use social media platforms, such as Twitter, effectively in medical education. Furthermore, there is limited evidence

RESOURCE: Some CME experts remain skeptical on social media

SPEED, COST, and ACCESSIBILITY What makes social media an attractive CME tool is its accessibility and low cost, not to mention the speed with which it prompts immediate interaction, notes Brian McGowan, cofounder and chief learning officer of ArcheMedX, a healthcare e-learning company. Michael Leis, SVP, social strategy at Digitas Health

ABSTRACT: Upgrading a Social Media Strategy to Increase Twitter Engagement During the Annual Meeting

Microblogs known as "tweets" are a rapid, effective method of information dissemination in health care. Although several medical specialties have described their Twitter conference experiences, Twitter-related data in the fields of anesthesiology and pain medicine are sparse. We therefore analyzed the Twitter content of 2 consecutive spring meetings of the

MANUSCRIPT: Social Media in Health Science Education: An International Survey

BACKGROUND: Social media is an asset that higher education students can use for an array of purposes. Studies have shown the merits of social media use in educational settings; however, its adoption in health science education has been slow, and the contributing reasons remain unclear. OBJECTIVE: This multidisciplinary study aimed to examine health

MANUSCRIPT: Leveraging Social Media to Promote Evidence-Based Continuing Medical Education

IMPORTANCE: New dissemination methods are needed to engage physicians in evidence-based continuing medical education (CME). OBJECTIVE: To examine the effectiveness of social media in engaging physicians in non-industry-sponsored CME. DESIGN: We tested the effect of different media platforms (e-mail, Facebook, paid Facebook and Twitter), CME topics, and different "hooks" (e.g., Q&A, clinical pearl and best

ABSTRACT: FOAMSearch.net: A custom search engine for emergency medicine and critical care

The number of online resources read by and pertinent to clinicians has increased dramatically. However, most healthcare professionals still use mainstream search engines as their primary port of entry to the resources on the Internet. These search engines use algorithms that do not make it easy to find clinician-oriented resources.