Category : Medical Education

ABSTRACT: Randomized controlled trials of simulation-based interventions in Emergency Medicine: a methodological review

The number of trials assessing Simulation-Based Medical Education (SBME) interventions has rapidly expanded. Many studies show that potential flaws in design, conduct and reporting of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) can bias their results. We conducted a methodological review of RCTs assessing a SBME in Emergency Medicine (EM) and examined their

MANUSCRIPT: Computer model for the cardiovascular system: development of an e-learning tool for teaching of medical students

BACKGROUND: This study combined themes in cardiovascular modelling, clinical cardiology and e-learning to create an on-line environment that would assist undergraduate medical students in understanding key physiological and pathophysiological processes in the cardiovascular system. METHODS: An interactive on-line environment was developed incorporating a lumped-parameter mathematical model of the human cardiovascular system. The model

MANUSCRIPT: Is a Three-Dimensional Printing Model Better Than a Traditional Cardiac Model for Medical Education?

BACKGROUND: Three-dimensional (3D) printing is a newly-emerged technology converting a series of two-dimensional images to a touchable 3D model, but no studies have investigated whether or not a 3D printing model is better than a traditional cardiac model for medical education. METHODS: A 3D printing cardiac model was generated using multi-slice computed tomography

ABSTRACT: Structured education to improve primary-care management of headache: how long do the benefits last?

BACKGROUND: Our earlier study showed that structured education of general practitioners (GPs) improved their practice in headache management. Here we assess duration of this effect. METHODS: In a follow-up observational study in Southern Estonia, subjects were the same six GPs as previously, managing patients presenting with headache as the main complaint. Data reflecting

ABSTRACT: The interrupted learner: How distractions during live and video lectures influence learning outcomes

New instructional technologies have been increasingly incorporated into the medical school learning environment, including lecture video recordings as a substitute for live lecture attendance. The literature presents varying conclusions regarding how this alternative experience impacts students' academic success. Previously, a multi-year study of the first-year medical histology component at the

MANUSCRIPT: The impact of web-based and face-to-face simulation on patient deterioration and patient safety: protocol for a multi-site multi-method design

BACKGROUND: There are international concerns in relation to the management of patient deterioration which has led to a body of evidence known as the 'failure to rescue' literature. Nursing staff are known to miss cues of deterioration and often fail to call for assistance. Medical Emergency Teams (Rapid Response Teams) do

ABSTRACT: How cognitive engagement fluctuates during a team-based learning session and how it predicts academic achievement.

The objective of the paper is to report findings of two studies that attempted to find answers to the following questions: (1) What are the levels of cognitive engagement in TBL? (2) Are there differences between students who were more exposed to TBL than students who were less exposed to

MANUSCRIPT: Comparison of the Impact of Wikipedia, UpToDate, and a Digital Textbook on Short-Term Knowledge Acquisition Among Medical Students

BACKGROUND: Web-based resources are commonly used by medical students to supplement curricular material. Three commonly used resources are UpToDate (Wolters Kluwer Inc), digital textbooks, and Wikipedia; there are concerns, however, regarding Wikipedia's reliability and accuracy. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of Wikipedia use on medical students' short-term

ABSTRACT: Learner, Patient, and Supervisor Features Are Associated With Different Types of Cognitive Load During Procedural Skills Training

PURPOSE: Cognitive load theory, focusing on limits of the working memory, is relevant to medical education; however, factors associated with cognitive load during procedural skills training are not well characterized. The authors sought to determine how features of learners, patients/tasks, settings, and supervisors were associated with three types of cognitive load

ABSTRACT: Use of the pause procedure in continuing medical education: A randomized controlled intervention study.

During lectures, a pause procedure (the presenter pauses so students can discuss content) can improve educational outcomes. We aimed to determine whether (1) continuing medical education (CME) presentations with a pause procedure were evaluated more favorably and (2) a pause procedure improved recall. In this randomized controlled intervention study of