Category : Education Technology

ABSTRACT: The effectiveness of internet-based e-learning on clinician behavior and patient outcomes: a systematic review protocol

REVIEW QUESTION/OBJECTIVE: The objective of this systematic review is to identify, appraise and synthesize the best available evidence for the effectiveness of internet-based e-learning programs on health care professional behavior and patient outcomes. BACKGROUND: Technological innovation has not only impacted social change in recent years but has been the prime driver of educational

ABSTRACT: Systematic review of e-learning for surgical training

BACKGROUND: Internet and software-based platforms (e-learning) have gained popularity as teaching tools in medical education. Despite widespread use, there is limited evidence to support their effectiveness for surgical training. This study sought to evaluate the effectiveness of e-learning as a teaching tool compared with no intervention and other methods of surgical

ABSTRACT: Using video podcasting to enhance the learning of clinical skills

BACKGROUND: Video podcasts, or vodcasts are increasingly used by a range of healthcare professions in the mastery of new skills. Little is known about the experiences of using vodcasts in physiotherapy education. Traditional pedagogic strategies have been employed in order to master those skills required for physiotherapy practice. There have been

MANUSCRIPT: A comparative study: do “clickers” increase student engagement in multidisciplinary clinical microbiology teaching?

BACKGROUND: Audience response devices, or "clickers", have been used in the education of future healthcare professionals for several years with varying success. They have been reported to improve the learning experience by promoting engagement and knowledge retention. In 2014, our department evaluated the use of "clickers" in a newly introduced multidisciplinary

ABSTRACT: Exploratory Study of Rural Physicians’ Self-Directed Learning Experiences in a Digital Age

INTRODUCTION: The nature and characteristics of self-directed learning (SDL) by physicians has been transformed with the growth in digital, social, and mobile technologies (DSMTs). Although these technologies present opportunities for greater "just-in-time" information seeking, there are issues for ensuring effective and efficient usage to compliment one's repertoire for continuous learning. The

MANUSCRIPT: Continuing Professional Development via Social Media or Conference Attendance: A Cost Analysis

BACKGROUND: Professional development is essential in the health disciplines. Knowing the cost and value of educational approaches informs decisions and choices about learning and teaching practices. OBJECTIVE: The primary aim of this study was to conduct a cost analysis of participation in continuing professional development via social media compared with live conference attendance. METHODS: Clinicians

MANUSCRIPT: Usage of 3D models of tetralogy of Fallot for medical education: impact on learning congenital heart disease

Background Congenital heart disease (CHD) is the most common human birth defect, and clinicians need to understand the anatomy to effectively care for patients with CHD. However, standard two-dimensional (2D) display methods do not adequately carry the critical spatial information to reflect CHD anatomy. Three-dimensional (3D) models may be useful in

RESOURCE: Some CME experts remain skeptical on social media

SPEED, COST, and ACCESSIBILITY What makes social media an attractive CME tool is its accessibility and low cost, not to mention the speed with which it prompts immediate interaction, notes Brian McGowan, cofounder and chief learning officer of ArcheMedX, a healthcare e-learning company. Michael Leis, SVP, social strategy at Digitas Health

ABSTRACT: Anatomy education for the YouTube generation

Anatomy remains a cornerstone of medical education despite challenges that have seen a significant reduction in contact hours over recent decades; however, the rise of the "YouTube Generation" or "Generation Connected" (Gen C), offers new possibilities for anatomy education. Gen C, which consists of 80% Millennials, actively interact with social