Category : Abstract

ABSTRACT: Randomized controlled trials of simulation-based interventions in Emergency Medicine: a methodological review

The number of trials assessing Simulation-Based Medical Education (SBME) interventions has rapidly expanded. Many studies show that potential flaws in design, conduct and reporting of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) can bias their results. We conducted a methodological review of RCTs assessing a SBME in Emergency Medicine (EM) and examined their

ABSTRACT: Structured education to improve primary-care management of headache: how long do the benefits last?

BACKGROUND: Our earlier study showed that structured education of general practitioners (GPs) improved their practice in headache management. Here we assess duration of this effect. METHODS: In a follow-up observational study in Southern Estonia, subjects were the same six GPs as previously, managing patients presenting with headache as the main complaint. Data reflecting

ABSTRACT: The interrupted learner: How distractions during live and video lectures influence learning outcomes

New instructional technologies have been increasingly incorporated into the medical school learning environment, including lecture video recordings as a substitute for live lecture attendance. The literature presents varying conclusions regarding how this alternative experience impacts students' academic success. Previously, a multi-year study of the first-year medical histology component at the

ABSTRACT: How cognitive engagement fluctuates during a team-based learning session and how it predicts academic achievement.

The objective of the paper is to report findings of two studies that attempted to find answers to the following questions: (1) What are the levels of cognitive engagement in TBL? (2) Are there differences between students who were more exposed to TBL than students who were less exposed to

ABSTRACT: Learner, Patient, and Supervisor Features Are Associated With Different Types of Cognitive Load During Procedural Skills Training

PURPOSE: Cognitive load theory, focusing on limits of the working memory, is relevant to medical education; however, factors associated with cognitive load during procedural skills training are not well characterized. The authors sought to determine how features of learners, patients/tasks, settings, and supervisors were associated with three types of cognitive load

ABSTRACT: Use of the pause procedure in continuing medical education: A randomized controlled intervention study.

During lectures, a pause procedure (the presenter pauses so students can discuss content) can improve educational outcomes. We aimed to determine whether (1) continuing medical education (CME) presentations with a pause procedure were evaluated more favorably and (2) a pause procedure improved recall. In this randomized controlled intervention study of

ABSTRACT: Medical education of attention: A qualitative study of learning to listen to sound.

INTRODUCTION: There has been little qualitative research examining how physical examination skills are learned, particularly the sensory and subjective aspects of learning. The authors set out to study how medical students are taught and learn the skills of listening to sound. METHODS: As part of an ethnographic study in Melbourne, 15 semi-structured in-depth

ABSTRACT: Creating a longitudinal database in medical education: Perspectives from the pioneers.

The Jefferson Longitudinal Study of Medical Education (JLSME) is the longest running database in medical education and covers the collection and measurement of background, learning, performance, and psychosocial variables before, during, and after medical school. Recently, our research group at VU University Medical Center School of Medical Sciences launched a

ABSTRACT: A Plea for MERSQI: The Medical Education Research Study Quality Instrument.

OBJECTIVE: To describe the quality of educational scholarship presented at a large national conference of obstetrics and gynecology educators. METHODS: We reviewed Council on Resident Education in Obstetrics and Gynecology-Association of Professors of Gynecology and Obstetrics annual meeting abstracts from 2015 and 2016, published as supplements to Obstetrics & Gynecology. For this uncontrolled

ABSTRACT: Learning and study strategies correlate with medical students’ performance in anatomical sciences.

Much of the content delivered during medical students' preclinical years is assessed nationally by such testing as the United States Medical Licensing Examination® (USMLE® ) Step 1 and Comprehensive Osteopathic Medical Licensing Examination® (COMPLEX-USA® ) Step 1. Improvement of student study/learning strategies skills is associated with academic success in internal