Category : Abstract

ABSTRACT: Flipped classroom improves student learning in health professions education: a meta-analysis

BACKGROUND:The use of flipped classroom approach has become increasingly popular in health professions education. However, no meta-analysis has been published that specifically examines the effect of flipped classroom versus traditional classroom on student learning. This study examined the findings of comparative articles through a meta-analysis in order to summarize the

ABSTRACT: Evaluation by undergraduate medical students of a role-playing training program

OBJECTIVES: Acute states of agitation (ASAs) are frequent in daily medical practice. However, training on real ASAs raises technical and ethical issues, whereas lecture-based teaching hardly addresses some educational objectives, e.g., improving relational skills and team-based coordination. Simulation-based medical education (SBME) is a promising medium to train students on managing ASAs.

ABSTRACT: Team-Based Learning Module for Undergraduate Medical Education

Human papilloma virus (HPV) vaccination rates lag behind other vaccines, primarily because of weak provider recommendations, and are associated with nearly 30,000 new cancer diagnoses a year. Educating medical students about HPV using active, team-centered learning may increase assimilation of information and may increase vaccination rates. A team-based learning (TBL)

ABSTRACT: Implementation of a “Flipped Classroom” for Neurosurgery Resident Education

INTRODUCTION: Engaging residents across a multiyear training spectrum is challenging given the heterogeneity of experience and limited time available for educational activities. A "flipped classroom" model, in which residents prepare ahead of time for mentored topic discussions, has potential advantages. METHODS: We implemented a curriculum consisting of topics distributed across the specialty. Weekly,

ABSTRACT: Improving learning and confidence through small group, structured otoscopy teaching

BACKGROUND: Otologic diseases are common and associated with significant health care costs. While accurate diagnosis relies on physical exam, existing studies have highlighted a lack of comfort among trainees with regards to otoscopy. As such, dedicated otoscopy teaching time was incorporated into the undergraduate medical curriculum in the form of a

ABSTRACT: Curated Collection for Educators: Five Key Papers about the Flipped Classroom Methodology

The flipped classroom (FC) pedagogy is becoming increasingly popular in medical education due to its appeal to the millennial learner and potential benefits in knowledge acquisition. Despite its popularity and effectiveness, the FC educational method is not without challenges. In this article, we identify and summarize several key papers relevant

ABSTRACT: Application of flipped classroom pedagogy to the human gross anatomy laboratory

To improve student preparedness for anatomy laboratory dissection, the dental gross anatomy laboratory was transformed using flipped classroom pedagogy. Instead of spending class time explaining the procedures and anatomical structures for each laboratory, students were provided online materials to prepare for laboratory on their own. Eliminating in-class preparation provided the

ABSTRACT: Active Learning Strategies to Enhance Nursing Students’ Knowledge of Pharmacology

This article presents the author's experience using gaming and social media to enhance undergraduate nursing students' pharmacology knowledge. Although gaming may help with rote learning, active participation in gaming was not associated with higher exam or final course grades. Active participation in social media, on the other hand, was associated

ABSTRACT: Flexible competency based medical education: More time efficient, higher costs

The financing of postgraduate medical education (PGME) becomes an important topic. PGME is costly, and in most western countries is partly paid by public funding. One of the models that can help to reduce costs is time-variable PGME. Moving to true outcome-based education can lead to more efficient training programs

ABSTRACT: Resident versus faculty member simulation debriefing

BACKGROUND: Near-peer teaching is effective in graduate medical education, but it has not been compared with faculty member teaching in resident simulation. In this study, we sought to compare debriefing sessions of internal medicine (IM) intern simulation sessions led by academic faculty doctors with those led by senior IM residents in