Tag : learning actions

ABSTRACT: Medical education of attention: A qualitative study of learning to listen to sound.

INTRODUCTION: There has been little qualitative research examining how physical examination skills are learned, particularly the sensory and subjective aspects of learning. The authors set out to study how medical students are taught and learn the skills of listening to sound. METHODS: As part of an ethnographic study in Melbourne, 15 semi-structured in-depth

ABSTRACT: Learning and study strategies correlate with medical students’ performance in anatomical sciences.

Much of the content delivered during medical students' preclinical years is assessed nationally by such testing as the United States Medical Licensing Examination® (USMLE® ) Step 1 and Comprehensive Osteopathic Medical Licensing Examination® (COMPLEX-USA® ) Step 1. Improvement of student study/learning strategies skills is associated with academic success in internal

What We’ve Learned about Note-taking in Continuing Education

If we go all the way back (now nearly 6 years ago) to the original Learning Actions research project, one of the first insights gained was that note-taking is a nearly universal behavior that clinician-learners rely on to support their learning process. In fact, from my initial interviews I found

ABSTRACT: Study skills in anatomy and physiology: Is there a difference?

Many factors influence the way individual students study, including but not limited to: previous coursework, attitudes toward the class (motivation, intimidation, risk, etc.), metacognition, and work schedules. However, little of this research has involved medical students. The present article asks the question, "Do individual medical students study differently for different

ABSTRACT: Actual drawing of histological images improves knowledge retention

Medical students have to process a large amount of information during the first years of their study, which has to be retained over long periods of nonuse. Therefore, it would be beneficial when knowledge is gained in a way that promotes long-term retention. Paper-and-pencil drawings for the uptake of form-function

Featured Article: New CME Architecture Aims to Enable Better Learning

By Sue Pelletier | MeetingsNet “There’s an assumption that CME providers tend to make—we have all made it—that learners know what to do with the information they gather during continuing medical education activities, that learners know how to learn efficiently,” says Medical Meetings columnist, research scientist, and educational technologist Brian S. McGowan, PhD. “While

ABSTRACT: Don’t forget the learner: an essential aspect for developing effective hypermedia online learning in continuing medical education.

Abstract There is increasing use of hypermedia online learning in continuing medical education (CME) that presents the learner with a wide range of different learning resources, requiring the learner to use self-regulated learning (SRL) skills. This study is the first to apply an SRL perspective to understand how learners engage with