Tag : Learning Actions model

What We’ve Learned about Note-taking in Continuing Education

If we go all the way back (now nearly 6 years ago) to the original Learning Actions research project, one of the first insights gained was that note-taking is a nearly universal behavior that clinician-learners rely on to support their learning process. In fact, from my initial interviews I found

ABSTRACT: Study skills in anatomy and physiology: Is there a difference?

Many factors influence the way individual students study, including but not limited to: previous coursework, attitudes toward the class (motivation, intimidation, risk, etc.), metacognition, and work schedules. However, little of this research has involved medical students. The present article asks the question, "Do individual medical students study differently for different

ABSTRACT: Actual drawing of histological images improves knowledge retention

Medical students have to process a large amount of information during the first years of their study, which has to be retained over long periods of nonuse. Therefore, it would be beneficial when knowledge is gained in a way that promotes long-term retention. Paper-and-pencil drawings for the uptake of form-function

Defining (real) learner engagement in online educational interventions

Over the weekend I came across an interesting article in the latest Alliance Almanac, "Defining Participants and Learners in CME: Standardizing Language for Online Activity Reporting." Access to this article is limited to Alliance members, but in a nutshell, here is the take-away: Showing the overall number of people who engaged in our online CME activities,

ABSTRACT: Improving Learning Efficiency of Factual Knowledge in Medical Education

OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this review is to synthesize recent literature relating to factual knowledge acquisition and retention and to explore its applications to medical education. RESULTS: Distributing, or spacing, practice is superior to massed practice (i.e. cramming). Testing, compared to re-study, produces better learning and knowledge retention, especially if tested as retrieval

The relationship between learning and the limitations of our working memory

I’ve been reading more and more recently about the connection between adult learning theory, cognitive science, and the underling physiology of learning – this is a critical body of literature for those planning and creating education. And while the complexity of this field of study is seemingly limitless, one of

RESOURCE: MIT Researchers: Crowdsourced Outlines Improve Learning from Videos

A team of researchers from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and Harvard University are using crowd-sourced conceptual outlines to help learners get more out of educational videos. The outlines can work as navigation tools, so that "viewers already familiar with some of a video's content can skip ahead, while others can backtrack