Tag : clinical reasoning

MANUSCRIPT: Improving the learning of clinical reasoning through computer-based cognitive representation

OBJECTIVE: Clinical reasoning is usually taught using a problem-solving approach, which is widely adopted in medical education. However, learning through problem solving is difficult as a result of the contextualization and dynamic aspects of actual problems. Moreover, knowledge acquired from problem-solving practice tends to be inert and fragmented. This study proposed

ABSTRACT: Twelve tips to support the development of clinical reasoning skills using virtual patient cases.

Clinical reasoning is a critical core competency in medical education. Strategies to support the development of clinical reasoning skills have focused on methodologies used in traditional settings, including lectures, small groups, activities within Simulation Centers and the clinical arena. However, the evolving role and growing utilization of virtual patients (VPs)

ABSTRACT: Medical education and cognitive continuum theory: an alternative perspective on medical problem solving and clinical reasoning

Recently, human reasoning, problem solving, and decision making have been viewed as products of two separate systems: "System 1," the unconscious, intuitive, or nonanalytic system, and "System 2," the conscious, analytic, or reflective system. This view has penetrated the medical education literature, yet the idea of two independent dichotomous cognitive

ABSTRACT: Educational strategies for improving clinical reasoning

Clinical reasoning serves as a crucial skill for all physicians regardless of their area of expertise. Helping trainees develop effective and appropriate clinical reasoning abilities is a central aim of medical education. Teaching clinical reasoning however can be a very difficult challenge for practicing physicians. Better understanding of the different