Resource Center

ABSTRACT: Board game versus lecture-based seminar in the teaching of pharmacology of antimicrobial drugs – a randomised controlled trial

BACKGROUND:
The effectiveness of an educational board game developed to teach the pharmacology of antimicrobial drugs to medical students was compared with the lecture-based seminar as a supplemental tool to improve short- and long-term knowledge retention and the perception of the learning method by students.
METHODS:
A group of 124 students was randomised to board game and control groups. Short-term knowledge retention was assessed by comparing differences in post- and pre-tests scores, and long-term knowledge retention by comparing final examination scores.
RESULTS:
Both didactic methods seem to improve short-term knowledge retention to similar extent. Long-term knowledge retention of board game seminar participants was higher than those who attended the lecture-based seminar (ANCOVA, p = 0.035). The effect was most pronounced within 14 days after the intervention (ANOVA, p = 0.007). The board game was well perceived by the students.
CONCLUSIONS:
The board game seems to be a promising didactic tool, however, it should be further tested to assess its full educational utility.

via Board game versus lecture-based seminar in the teaching of pharmacology of antimicrobial drugs – a randomised controlled trial. – PubMed – NCBI.

Brian S McGowan, PhD

Written by

Brian is a research scientist and educational technologist. He helped transform Pfizer’s Medical Education Group and previously served in educational leadership roles at HealthAnswers, Inc.; Acumentis, LLC.; Cephalon; and Wyeth. He taught graduate medical education programs at Arcadia University for 10 years. Dr. McGowan recently authored the book "#socialQI: Simple Solutions for Improving Your Healthcare" and has been invited to speak internationally on the subject of information flow, technology, and learning in healthcare.

Leave a Comment